It’s Time to Free Ourselves From WTO Bondage!

NEW – July 13, 2022

Ten years ago, on the eve of Russia’s accession to the WTO, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde recognised the economic meaninglessness of this step for Russia. And two years ago, the then Prime Minister Kasyanov asked about the economic meaning of the accession of the then WTO lobbyist, Minister of Economic Development Gref, and he could not say anything intelligible.

In fact, in 2012, systemic liberals pushed Russia into the WTO with the hands of then Deputy Prime Minister Shuvalov in order to undermine Eurasian integration. The Customs Union, whose engine was Glazyev, was gaining strength and creating a threat to the West – and Russia was attached to the WTO to neutralise this danger.

Government liberals imposed on us unilateral fulfilment of WTO demands long before joining it. Therefore, the West was not interested in formally accepting us: it received the main benefits from fruitless negotiations that have been going on intensively since 2000. But when, in order to prevent Russia from creating its own global economic zone, we were still pushed into the WTO, we received new monstrous concessions.

As a result, we joined the WTO on obviously enslaving, colonial conditions. This put our economy at a disadvantage compared to foreign competitors and sharply slowed down its growth, replaced investment growth with a recession and led to a prolonged industrial recession, despite the high oil prices at that time.

The tariff protection of our economy at the end of the transition period has become lower than the Chinese one. That is, the government liberals who have accepted these conditions either want to destroy our economy in the interests of the global monopolies they serve, or consider it more competitive than the Chinese one.

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WTO rules allow Western countries to protect their markets and open up the markets of everyone else. The system of trade disputes is arranged in such a way that developed countries almost always win against less developed ones.

Joining the WTO makes sense for large exporters of civilian high-tech products; for Russia, this is guaranteed monstrous damage.

We need reasonable protectionism, because China does everything we do with our hands cheaper, and often better than us. If we want to have jobs, we must follow the example of developed countries, most of which, without admitting it, are increasing protectionism due to the global crisis. From 2008 to 2013, of all the G20 countries, only Russia did not strengthen the protection of its economy, but then we were brought to a common denominator by sanctions.

While the aggressor countries freeze our assets, impose sanctions against us and have not compensated us for material and moral damage, we are obliged to suspend the WTO agreements and impose protective duties on the products of these countries (except, of course, critically important imports) according to the needs of our economy – from 80%.

The interests of Russia’s development require an early exit from the WTO agreements with the complete cancellation of all bonded obligations. Yes, this is impossible under ordinary commercial law, but the West has already destroyed it by seizing and plundering our assets, including those with diplomatic immunity.

In addition, under international law, any corrupt transaction is null and void. It is necessary to carefully check the motivation of the liberals who pushed Russia into the WTO. Given their reputation, intelligence and the obvious disadvantage of the agreements they signed for Russia, the likelihood of corruption is exceptionally high.

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In order to ensure social, technological, and economic progress, and for normal human life, Russia must free itself from the shackles of the WTO and ensure reasonable, generally in the form of import duties of 40%, protection of its enterprises and its labour from external unfair competition.


Mikhail Delyagin

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